New artificial skin developed by Dutch, Belgian researchers

BEVERWIJK-HUIDBANK-HUIDTRANSPLANTATIE
Development of artificial skin Glyaderm, derived from human donor skin, started at the Euro Tissue Bank in 2011 (photo: Euro Tissue Bank). Development of artificial skin Glyaderm, derived from human donor skin, started at the Euro Tissue Bank in 2011 (photo: Euro Tissue Bank)

Dutch and Belgian researchers have developed a new type of artificial skin for the treatment of severe burns and other large and deep wounds patients incur in procedures, like a mastectomy. The researchers then handed over the patent to the Euro Tissue Bank in Beverwijk and burn center at the University Hospital Ghent in Belgium. 

The new artificial skin is relatively easy to make, the researchers say. Due to it being a not-for-profit product and the uncomplicated production process, the skin is less expensive to use than more common alternatives. This could make it more readily available for doctors and patients in poor countries, broadcaster NOS reports.

Its elasticity surpasses that of other artificial skins, making it helpful in rescuing burned limbs. This new artificial skin is composed of the skin's outer layer, the epidermis, and the underlaying dermis to ensure its elasticity. In large burns, both parts of the skin are often damaged beyond repair.

Money generated by the sale of the artificial skin will be put into research, or used for the wholesale purchase of the material to to treat poor people.

The skin itself is made from human skin donated by a close match to the target patient.

Tags: